Tag Archives: student debt

Serious Delinquency Rates Rise As Consumer Debt Hits New Highs In 2017

The Federal Reserve Bank of New York has released its Household Debt and Credit Report for the first quarter of 2017.

According to the report, household debt has now reached an all-time high. Gains in mortgage debt, auto debt and student debt were all cited. This all-time high now stands at $12.73 trillion and was $149 billion higher than in the fourth quarter of 2016. What stands out here is that it is about $50 billion above the previous peak reached back in the third quarter of 2008 — right before the recession kicked into overdrive.

While the New York Fed showed that aggregate delinquency rates were roughly flat in the first quarter of 2017, some 4.8% of outstanding debt was listed as being in some stage of delinquency. Of that total, $615 billion of debt listed as is delinquent, some $426 billion is listed as seriously delinquent — at least 90 days late or “severely derogatory.”

Debt balances climbed in several areas. Mortgage debt rose 1.7% (up $147 billion) to $8.63 trillion. Balances on home equity lines of credit fell slightly in the first quarter, down $19 billion to $456 billion. Car loans were up 0.9% (up $10 billion) and student loans were up 2.6% (up $34 billion).

It may sound impressive that credit card balances were actually down by 1.9% (by $15 billion) in the first quarter, but there is a seasonal aspect to that component and there are some troubling signs on the internal credit card metrics. Of the $764 billion in credit card balances as a whole, the credit card with 90 or more day delinquency rates deteriorated and they now stand at 7.5%.

It was shown that early delinquency flows have improved since the recession, but there has been a slow deterioration in auto loan performance and a more recent uptick in early delinquency rates on credit card debt.

On student debt, the percentage of student loan balances that transition to serious delinquency has remained high, around 10% and that has been the case over the past five years.

Bankruptcy notations and credit inquires also have to be considered here for the full picture. Some 203,000 consumers had a bankruptcy notation added to their credit reports in the first quarter of 2017, which is 1.7% lower than a year earlier, and the New York Fed called it another record series-low. The number of credit inquiries within the past six months, which the New York Fed calls an indicator of consumer credit demand, declined from the previous quarter to 162 million.

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By John C. Ogg | 24/7 Wall Street

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Parent Plus Student Loans: How to Screw Parents and Kids in a Single Shot

It’s easy to get student loans thanks to the aptly named “Parent Plus” program, a subprime loan trap that ensnares parents plus their college-age children. The program was enacted by Congress in the 1980s, but president Obama promoted it heavily.

The results speak for themselves: Nearly 40% of the loans are subprime. The default rate exceeds the rate for U.S. mortgages at the peak of the housing crisis.

Kids graduate from college with useless degrees, plus parents and kids are stuck with massive bills that cannot be paid back.

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It’s Easy for Parents to Get College Loans—Repaying Them Is Another Story.

Student loans made through parents come from an Education Department program called Parent Plus, which has loans outstanding to more than three million Americans. The problem is the government asks almost nothing about its borrowers’ incomes, existing debts, savings, credit scores or ability to repay. Then it extends loans that are nearly impossible to extinguish in bankruptcy if borrowers fall on hard times.

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As of September 2015, more than 330,000 people, or 11% of borrowers, had gone at least a year without making a payment on a Parent Plus loan, according to the Government Accountability Office. That exceeds the default rate on U.S. mortgages at the peak of the housing crisis. More recent Education Department data show another 180,000 of the loans were at least a month delinquent as of May 2016.

“This credit is being extended on terms that specifically, willfully ignore their ability to repay,” says Toby Merrill of Harvard Law School’s Legal Services Center. “You can’t avoid that we’re targeting high-cost, high-dollar-amount loans to people who we know can’t afford to repay them.”

The number of Americans with federal student loans, including through programs for undergraduates, parents and graduate students, grew by 14 million to 42 million in the decade through last year. Overall student debt, most of it issued by the federal government, more than doubled to $1.3 trillion over that period.

The financing fueled a surge in college enrollment. Between 2005 and 2010, enrollment grew 20%, the biggest increase since the 1970s. The Obama administration supported such lending in an effort to widen access to college education.

Nearly four in 10 student loans—the vast majority of them federal ones—went to borrowers with credit scores below the subprime threshold of 620, indicating they were at the highest risk of defaulting, according to a Wall Street Journal analysis of data from credit-rating firm Equifax Inc. That figure excludes borrowers, such as many 18-year-old freshmen, who lacked scores because of shallow credit histories. By comparison, subprime mortgages peaked at nearly 20% of all mortgage originations in 2006.

Roughly eight million Americans owing $137 billion are at least 360 days delinquent on federal student loans, nearly the number of homeowners who lost their homes because of the housing crisis. More than three million others owing $88 billion have fallen at least a month behind or have been granted temporary reprieves on payments because of financial distress.

Joint Effort

In 2005, president Bush signed the bankruptcy reform act of 2005 making student loans not dischargeable in bankruptcy.

President Obama came along next and encouraged parents who had no idea what they were getting into to sign loans to put their kids through college.

Parents plus their kids are mired in debt that cannot be paid back. Thank you Congress, President Bush, and President Obama.

Surefire Way to Discharge the Loans

There is one way to get rid of these loans. Die.

Stop the Madness

Wherever government meddles, costs rise dramatically.

The solution is to stop the meddling: Stop all the loan programs, stop all the aid programs, stop insisting that everyone needs to go to college, and start accrediting programs and course offerings from places like the Khan Academy.

Not a single student aid program aided any students. Rather, escalating costs went to teachers, administrators, and their pensions as student debt piled sky high.

By Mike “Mish” Shedlock

Student Debt Could Reduce Home Sales 8% This Year, Report Says


By Nick Timiros

Higher levels of student debt will reduce U.S. home sales by around 8% this year, according to a report released Friday by John Burns Real Estate Consulting, an advisory firm.

The paper examines the impact of student debt on purchase activity for households under age 40. Those households account for around two-thirds of student debt holders. It concludes that sales of new and existing home will total 5.26 million this year, with some 414,000 “lost” households as a result of rising student debt burdens.

Higher debt burdens will defer home purchases for many borrowers while requiring others to buy a less expensive home in order to qualify for a loan or save for a down payment.

The paper estimates that every $250 per month in student loan debt reduces borrowers’ purchasing power by $44,000, and since 2005, some 3.8 million additional households have at least $250 per month in student debt.

Put differently, around 35% of households under age 40 have monthly student debt payments exceeding $250, up from 22% of households in 2005.

The typical first-time buyer can qualify for a $234,080 mortgage without any student debt, but that figure falls as the monthly debt burden rises. (The analysis assumes that the traditional first-time buyer has income of $61,000.) Mortgage lenders generally won’t extend credit to borrowers whose total debt payments exceed 43% of their gross incomes.

The analysis assumes that most borrowers with $750 or more in monthly student debt payments will be priced out of the market unless they’re making much more money than the traditional first-time buyer. For the typical entry-level buyer with $750 in monthly student debt payments, they can qualify for a $103,280 mortgage.

But the analysis finds that many borrowers with modest monthly student debt payments are also lost transactions this year. It concludes that around 57,000 households with student debt payments of less than $100 won’t be buying homes this year, and that around 127,000 borrowers with payments between $100 and $250 are lost.