Tag Archives: credit cards

Has Global End to Credit and Debit Cards Started in India?

India’s crackdown on cash caused chaos as 86% of the money in circulation vanished overnight. Banks could not cope with the increase in demand. Consumers did not turn to credit cards or debit cards as expected.  Instead, consumers turned to mobile apps.

Massive Growth of Mobile vs Dying Cards

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“A number of mobile payments are still small but growth is such that the Wall Street Journal asks Could India’s Cash Blitz Kill Off Cards, ATMs?

The value of mobile money transactions has more than doubled since the nullification of 86% of India’s cash in circulation in November, while those made with credit and debit cards has fallen, and check purchases have barely budged. Mobile payments still make up only a small percentage of overall transactions, but their surging popularity is being noticed.

At this rate, cards and automated teller machines could be redundant in India by 2020, predicted Amitabh Kant, head of NITI Aayog, the government’s economic policy-making body. India’s government, along with removing paper money, has encouraged electronic payments by loosening regulations and adding infrastructure.

Abdul Aziz Ansari had never accepted anything but rupees at his fish stand in a Mumbai suburb. When notes dried up during the cash crunch last year, his sales plummeted. His business looked set to fail, until he signed up for Paytm.

Still, the value of mobile-wallet payments remains lower than checks and cards, but they are catching up to credit cards. In February, mobile payments totaled 69.11 billion rupees ($1.07 billion), significantly behind checks at 6.4 trillion rupees and debit cards at 2.3 trillion rupees but approaching credit cards at 286 billion rupees.

The Reserve Bank of India has been easing rules and building the infrastructure needed to simplify payments. Last year, it started allowing more types of companies to offer digital wallets and has created a new payment system that allows people to connect their identification numbers, phones and bank accounts, providing them with one number for transfers to merchants or other people.

“Your mobile is not just going to be your wallet, it will be transformed into a bank,” Prime Minister Narendra Modi said at an April event promoting mobile money. “This can be the base of financial revolution for the world.”

India’s mobile-wallet leaders said they are adding millions of new users every month.

The phone makers Samsung and Apple, which are leading the race to enable more seamless mobile payments in the West, could have trouble catching up in India, analysts say, because their systems still require card readers that can communicate with smartphones. Samsung Pay launched in India this year, and Apple Pay has yet to start.

Accepted Here

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Not Accepted Here]

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Would you tie your bank account to a phone?

Death of Cash Coming

Western central banks will be monitoring these events closely. The death of cash money is coming.

By Mike “Mish” Shedlock

New Cars Could Limit Mortgage Options

Could that shiny new car you just financed with a big dealer loan or lease put a damper on your ability to refinance your mortgage or move to a different house? Could your growing debt — for autos, student loans and credit cards — make it tougher to come up with all the monthly payments you owe? Absolutely.

And some mortgage and credit analysts are beginning to cast a wary eye on the prodigious amounts of debt American homeowners are piling up. New research from Black Knight Financial Services, an analytics and technology company focused on the mortgage industry, reveals that homeowners’ non-mortgage debt has hit its highest level in 10 years.

New debt taken on to finance autos accounted for 81 percent of the increase — a direct consequence of booming car sales and attractive loan deals. The average transaction price of a new car or pickup truck in April was $33,560, according to Kelley Blue Book researchers.

Student-loan debt is also contributing to strains on owners’ budgets. Balances are up more than 55 percent since 2006.Credit-card debt is another factor, but it has not mushroomed like auto and student loans have. Nonetheless, homeowners carrying balances on their cards owe an average $8,684, according to Black Knight data.The jump in non-mortgage debt is especially noteworthy among owners with Federal Housing Administration and Veterans Affairs home loans. These borrowers — who typically have lower credit scores and make minimal down payments (as little as 3.5 percent for FHA, zero for VA) — now carry non-mortgage debt loads that average $29,415. By contrast, borrowers using conventional Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac financing have significantly lower debt loads — an average $22,414 — but typically have much higher credit scores and have made larger down payments.

Is there reason for concern? Bruce McClary, vice president at the National Foundation for Credit Counseling, thinks there could be if the pattern continues.

Some people have lost sight of the ground rules for responsible credit and are “pushing the boundaries,” he said.

Auto costs — monthly loan payments plus fuel and maintenance — shouldn’t exceed

15 to 20 percent of household income, he said. Yet some people who already have debt-strained budgets are buying new cars with easy-to-obtain dealer financing that knocks them well beyond prudent guidelines.

According to a recent study by credit bureau Equifax, total outstanding balances for auto loans and leases surged by

10.5 percent during the past 12 months. Of all auto loans originated through April, 23.5 percent were made to consumers with subprime credit scores.

Ben Graboske, senior vice president for data and analytics at Black Knight Financial Services, cautions that although rising debt loads might look ominous, there is no evidence that more borrowers are missing mortgage payments or heading for default. Thanks to rising home-equity holdings and improvements in employment, 30-day delinquencies on mortgages are just 2.3 percent, he said, the same level as they were in 2005, before the housing crisis. Even FHA delinquencies are relatively low at 4.53 percent.

But Graboske agrees that other consequences of high debt totals could limit homeowners’ financial options: They “are going to have less wiggle room” in refinancing their current mortgages or obtaining a new mortgage to buy another house.

Why?

Because debt-to-income ratios are a crucial part of mortgage underwriting and are stricter and less flexible than they were a decade ago. The more auto, student-loan and credit-card debt you have along with other recurring expenses such as alimony and child support, the tougher it will be to refinance or get a new home loan.

If your total monthly debt for mortgage and other obligations exceeds 45 percent of your monthly income, lenders who sell their mortgages to giant investors Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac could reject your application for a refinancing or new mortgage, absent strong compensating factors such as exceptional credit scores and substantial cash or investments in reserve. FHA is more flexible but generally doesn’t want to see debt levels above 50 percent.

Bottom line: Before signing up for a hefty loan on a new car, take a hard, sober look at the effect it will have on your debt-to-income ratio. When it comes to what Graboske calls your mortgage wiggle room, less debt, not more, might be the way to go.

Read more in The Columbus Dispatch where author Kenneth R. Harney covers housing issues on Capitol Hill for the Washington Post Writers Group. kenharney@earthlink.net