Tag Archives: Homeless

California Rents RVs And Hotel Rooms To Protect Homeless During Coronavirus Outbreak

  • Los Angeles’ homeless population will be sent to live in RVs as part of efforts to stem the spread of COVID-19
  • Anyone without a home in which to self-isolate will be provided with a hotel room or sent to live in an RV
  • Governor Gavin Newsom revealed up to 900 hotels were being prepared to house those with symptoms 
  • Coronavirus symptoms: what are they and should you see a doctor?

Holidaymakers have been asked to leave and others warned to avoid the area surrounding Dockweiler Beech RV site (pictured) in the city of El Segundo, California, amid preparation for the growing Coronavirus pandemic

Los Angeles’ homeless population could find themselves self-isolating inside a beachside RV in the coming months – as California frees up hundreds of motorhomes and hotel rooms for those in need.

Holidaymakers have been asked to leave and others warned to avoid the area surrounding Dockweiler Beech RV site in the city of El Segundo, California, amid preparation for the growing Coronavirus pandemic.

Hand washing stations have popped up in Los Angeles and San Francisco around large homeless populations and Governor Gavin Newsom revealed the state is acquiring around 900 hotels with tens of thousands of rooms to be converted for the use of both hospital patients and the homeless. 

In the next few weeks, dozens of camper vans parked along the beach front are expected to become home to vagrants ordered into quarantine.

California boasts a homeless population of more than 100,000 and with no way for them to wash their hands or maintain hygiene, it was a highly at-risk group – diseases already run rife with central LA’s Skid Row recently seeing outbreaks of typhus and Hepatitis A.

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Sonoma County California Plans To Evict Renters To Buy Million Dollar Housing For Hobos

SANTA ROSA (KPIX) — A controversial plan to solve the homeless crisis has people fired up in Sonoma County where officials plan to spend millions of dollars to buy three properties that would be used to house the homeless.

All three properties have one thing in common. They’re big and have multiple units, but many of those units are currently occupied by tenants.

“I’m sure the tenants have been asked to leave,” said Allen Thomas.  He lives near one of the three properties, 811 Davis Street in Santa Rosa.

Neighbors said it’s counterproductive to evict renters to house the homeless.

“It’s just insanity,” said Karen Sanders, who also lives in Santa Rosa.

Sonoma County leaders plan to buy two properties in Santa Rosa and one in Cotati. They’ll spend roughly one million dollars for each property. One county worker said they’re already in contract to buy the property on Davis Street.

“Million dollar homes; million dollar homes for these transients living on the trail,” said Sanders.

The county wants to get the homeless out of an encampment on the Joe Rodota Trail. Many neighbors of those three properties worry the new neighbors will bring along crime and other quality of life issues.

“I’m not NIMBY, but we’ve done enough,” said Sher Ennis, a neighbor who lives near the Davis street property.

She said she was attacked in her home by a man from a re-entry housing program years ago.  She worries about her safety.

“We don’t know. Are we getting dangerous criminals? Are we getting felons? Or are we getting people who are simply down on their luck,” said Ennis.

Another neighbor supports the county’s plan.

“I don’t think that it makes [the neighborhood] any less safe, no,” said Andrew Atkinson.

He said the county has to act now.

“It’s going to take more than this, I think, to solve the problem. But I’m glad to see they’re trying,” said Atkinson.

Many upset neighbors voiced their concerns at a community meeting Friday night in Santa Rosa. County leaders will talk about the plan to buy the houses and other solutions to house the homeless.

Source: by Da Lin | KPIX CBS SF Bay Area

Los Angeles Homelessness Czar to Resign After Homelessness Grows by 33%

Los Angeles’ head of homelessness announced on Tuesday, December 10, 2019 that he will be resigning after presiding over a 33 percent increase in homelessness during the last five years.

Peter Lynn, the head of the Los Angeles Homeless Service Authority, revealed that he would leave at the end of the year.

According to Paul Joseph Watson of Summit News, LAHSA reportedly spent $780 million with no effect.

The city’s homeless population grew even larger from 2018 to 2019, where it witnessed a 12 percent increase in that period.

Even with these unsavory facts in front of him, L.A. Mayor Eric Garcetti believed he did an amazing job and presided over “historic action.”

Lynn was apparently making $242,000 while homelessness went up along with cases of leprosy, typhoid fever, and even bubonic plague.

A few months ago, Dr. Drew Pinsky said L.A.’s public health infrastructure was a complete mess.

Source: by Jose Nino | Big League Politics

Nearly Half Of America’s Homeless People Live In California

Not only do nearly half of America’s homeless people live in California, but four of the five American cities with the greatest incidences of un-sheltered homelessness are in the Golden State.

As California becomes a mecca for socialism, their quality of life diminishes along with it in a characteristic dystopian decline.

San Francisco, Los Angeles, Santa Rosa, and San Jose are four of the five cities with the highest amount of homelessness. Seattle joins the California municipalities in the top five. According to Market Watch, the rates of homelessness are the highest in Washington D.C. The District of Columbia’s homeless rate is at 5.8 times the United States rate. New York is next, followed by Hawaii, Oregon, and California. These five states together comprise 20% of the overall U.S. population but 45% of the country’s homeless population.

All of these states are incredibly liberal with several already having instituted tight socialist policies.

A White House report teased out certain trends in homelessness across the country. Communities along both coasts have much larger homeless populations than those in the middle of the country. One driver of this trend is likely the more notable rise in housing prices along the coasts than in much of the Midwest.

The White House report identified local laws and policing practices as a potential differentiator. “Some [states] more than others engage in more stringent enforcement of quality of life issues like restrictions on the use of tents and encampments, loitering, and other related activities,” the report noted.Market Watch

The Trump administration has floated plans to fix the homeless crisis in liberal areas by deregulation. Many states and municipalities have zoning rules regarding the construction of both single-family and multi-family homes. These laws have impeded the builders’ ability to meet the demand for housing resulting in scarcity which has driven up prices. Experts and politicians across the political spectrum have suggested that relaxing such regulations could provide a boost to building activity.

CA Governor Newsom Blames Texas For CA Policies That Caused CA’s Homeless Crisis

California Statist Supremacist and authoritarian governor, Gavin Newsom, recently blamed the state of Texas for California’s homeless crisis; rather than taking blame for long established policies California has instituted that stifle free enterprise with excessive regulation and taxation on those working hard to create private wealth. 

Newsom said many homeless people on the streets of San Francisco are from Texas, in an attempt to shift the blame from himself and the polices of socialists (who get rich peddling socialism to the masses as everyone else becomes impoverished.)

Former California assemblyman turned Texas resident Chuck DeVore reacted to Newsom pushing the blame onto others. The vice president of the Texas Public Policy Foundation, Chuck DeVore, said Wednesday that Gavin Newsom is “responsible for the policies that have created California’s homeless crisis,” in the wake of the governor blaming Texas for San Francisco’s homeless crisis. “What you’re seeing here are the words of a desperate man that we should almost feel sorry for,” DeVore, who served as a California assemblyman for six years, told “Fox & Friends.”

“Governor Gavin Newsom has been in office now for 22 straight years, starting at the San Francisco board of supervisors,” DeVore added. Homelessness has been rampant across the state of California in the past few years and merchants and homeowners have become increasingly vocal and incredibly irate at how things are going in the socialist dystopia.

Though San Francisco has more billionaires per capita than anywhere else in the world, its homeless problem has rivaled third-world nations, according to Fox News.  So much for all that “wealth inequality” the socialists are constantly pushing down the throats of the ignorant.  Government policies are the most to blame for San Francisco’s wealth inequality.

DeVore doubled down on this, saying that the government’s enslavement of the people of Californian is exactly why he left. He decided to leave California because of its “high cost of living [and] very burdensome regulations and taxes.”

“There’s more freedom in places like Texas, more opportunity to do what you want to do,” he said.

The sad truth is that socialism doesn’t work and it never has in all the times it’s been tried.  Humans are not meant to be slaves and eventually, they figure out that no one has a higher claim over their lives than they do.

Source: by Mac Slavo | SHTFplan

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Owner Of Sacramento Business Destroyed By Homeless Pleads With CA Gov Newsom

The West Coast, Under Progressive Stewardship Is A Literal Toilet: 80% of coastal areas infected with toxic feces (biosludge), warns Dr. Drew

California’s Housing Bubble’s So Bad, 100s Forced To Live On Boats

California’s housing affordability crisis is getting worse. Affordability in San Francisco is now at 10-year lows, and only one in five households can afford to purchase a median-priced single-family home in the Bay Area. The crisis has driven many people onto the water, living on makeshift boats, outside marinas, and wealthy communities.

Sausalito officials and other agencies have been stepping up efforts to manage ‘anchor out’ mariners and floating debris in Richardson Bay. (Robert Tong/Marin Independent Journal)

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“Largest Ever Homeless Camp” Suddenly Appears In Minneapolis

The Associated Press (AP) has revealed a troubling story of the largest ever homeless encampment site mostly made up of Native Americans has quickly erected just south of downtown Minneapolis, Minnesota.

City officials are scrambling to contain the situation as two deaths in recent weeks, concerns about disease and infection, illicit drug use and the coming winter season, have sounded the alarm of a developing public health crisis.

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“Housing is a right,” Mayor Jacob Frey said. “We’re going to continue working as hard as we can to make sure the people in our city are guaranteed that right.”

The AP said approximately 300 people are living in the camp that is situated beside 16th Ave S & E Franklin Ave.

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Earlier this month, a team of AP reporters visited the camp and found dozens of tents lining the city street.

To their amazement, most of the residents were Native American.

The homeless camp — called the “Wall of Forgotten Natives” because it lined a highway sound barrier, is in a section of the city with a large concentration of American Indians that are suffering from extreme wealth, health, and education inequality. The AP said the tents stand on what was once considered Dakota land.

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“They came to an area, a geography that has long been identified as a part of the Native community. A lot of the camp residents feel at home, they feel safer,” said Robert Lilligren, vice chairman of the Metropolitan Urban Indian Directors.

The camp illuminates the inequalities (mentioned above) that face American Indians in the state. AP provides a shocking statistic that American Indians make up 1.1% of Hennepin County’s residents, but 16% of the homeless population, according to government data from April.

It is also a community that is being decimated by opioids. Minneapolis officials in July sued a group of opioid manufacturers and distributors, alleging their actions to promote prescription opioid drugs, such as OxyContin, have caused an addiction crisis straining the city’s resources.

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AP said one end of the camp had been designated for families, while adults — some of whom were high on drugs — were on the other end. In the middle, an organization called Natives Against Heroin, a tent where volunteers handed out bottles of water, food, and clothing. The group also provides addicts with clean needles, and most volunteers carry naloxone to treat overdoses.

“People are respectful,” said group founder James Cross. “But sometimes an addict will be coming off a high… We have to de-escalate. Not hurt them, just escort them off. And say “Hey, this is a family setting. This is a community. We’ve got kids, elders. We’ve got to make it safe.”

With hundreds of people living in close quarters, health officials fear an outbreak of infectious diseases like hepatitis A. Local support groups have started administering vaccines. Earlier this month, a woman died when she did not have an asthma inhaler, and one man died from a drug overdose.

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Local government agencies have set up areas to provide medical assistance, antibiotics, hygiene kits or other supplies. There are tents advertising free HIV testing, a place to apply for housing, and temporary showers. Portable restrooms and hand-sanitizing stations had also been positioned around the camp.

The Minneapolis City Council voted Wednesday to move the camp to a 1.5-acre commercial property owned by the Red Lake Nation. The decision came five days after Mayor Jacob Frey and representatives of ten tribes said the industrial site was the best place to relocate the tent city.

The new site at 2105-2109 Cedar Ave. South will not be ready until December because demolition work will take several months, according to David Frank, the city’s Community Planning and Economic Development director.

“We will go as quick as we can to have the interim navigation center operational and ready,” Frank said. “We have our permitting people standing by. We have our housing team, our facilities team and our projects management all lined up to do this work.”

The cost of preparing the site with living accommodations for dozens of people will be between $2 million and $2.5 million, Frank added.

Minneapolis’ homeless explosion comes as no surprise. The much larger trend at play is the nation’s homeless population increasing for the first time since 2010 — driven by housing affordability issues, and widening inequalities. But do not tell President Trump the real economy continues to deteriorate.

In 40 different venues over the last three months, President Trump declared the economy is the greatest, the best or the strongest in US history.

— Trump, in a speech at a steel plant in Illinois, July 26

“This is the greatest economy that we’ve had in our history, the best.”

— Trump, in a rally in Charleston, W.Va., Aug. 21

“You know, we have the best economy we’ve ever had, in the history of our country.”

— Trump, in an interview on “Fox and Friends,” Aug. 23

“It’s said now that our economy is the strongest it’s ever been in the history of our country, and you just have to take a look at the numbers.”

— Trump, in remarks on a White House vlog, Aug. 24

“We have the best economy the country’s ever had and it’s getting better.”

In a recent, Bank of America note titled “The Thundering World,” a major theme in development for the 2020s could be “the epic wealth inequality” that is plaguing the economy.

BofA says quantitative easing amplified income and wealth inequality over the last decade. The distribution of wealth is the widest ever. The top 1% own 40% of the global wealth; the bottom 80% own 7%.

What does this all mean? Well, decades of failed economic and social policies are about to come home to roost. The explosion of homelessness in Minneapolis over a short period, is an example of the breakdown of the social fabric that will strain many more municipalities across the country in the years ahead. The America that we knew will not be the same by 2030.

Source: ZeroHedge