Tag Archives: Yield Curve

Good Thing? US Treasury Curve Flattens To Zero As Unemployment Falls To Lowest Level Since 1969

Good thing! US unemployment has fallen to its lowest level since the 1960s.

The US Treasury 10-year – 3-month yield curve has flattened to zero as unemployment hits its 50 year low.

https://confoundedinterestnet.files.wordpress.com/2019/05/yc10u3.png

Is this signaling the end of a business cycle? Or is it signaling the excesses of central banking?

We are seeing turbulence in the US yield curve given the many economic uncertainties around the globe, like Brexit, China trade, etc.

https://confoundedinterestnet.files.wordpress.com/2019/05/usyc.png

At least devaluation of the US dollar Purchasing Power has slowed.

https://confoundedinterestnet.files.wordpress.com/2019/05/fed1913.png

Source: Confounded Interest

Advertisements

Hedge Fund CIO: “America’s Yield Curve Inversion Can Mean One Of Three Things”

Three Worlds

America’s yield curve inversion can mean one of three things,” said (Eric Peters, CIO of One River Asset Management). “We’re either living in a world of secular stagnation and investors worry that central banks no longer have sufficient policy tools to spur growth and inflation,” he continued. “Or the economy is simply sliding toward recession and the inversion will persist until the Fed panics and spurs a recovery,” he said. “Or we’re living in a world, where the market is moving in ways that defy historical norms because of global QE. And if that’s the case, the curve is sending a false signal.”

https://www.zerohedge.com/s3/files/inline-images/TSY%20yield%20curve%203.31.jpg?itok=B16pb_qT

“If we’re sliding toward recession, then it seems odd that credit markets are holding up so well,” continued the same CIO. “So keep an eye on those,” he said. “And if the curve is sending a false signal due to German and Japanese government bonds yielding less than zero out to 10yrs, then the recent Fed pivot and these low bond rates in America may very well spur a blow-off rally in stocks like in 1999.” A dovish Fed in 1998 (post-LTCM) and 1999 (pre-Y2K) provided the liquidity without which that parabolic rally could have never happened.

https://www.zerohedge.com/s3/files/inline-images/aligator%20jaws%20march%202019_1.jpg?itok=KGvQ1sIB

“But if investors believe America is succumbing to the secular stagnation that has gripped Japan and Europe, and if they’re growing scared that global central banks are no longer capable of rescuing markets, then we have a real problem,” said the CIO. “Because a recession is bad for markets, but not catastrophic provided that central banks can step in to spur recovery. But with global rates already so low, if investors lose faith in the ability of central banks to do what they have always done, then we’re vulnerable to a stock market crash.”

Sovereignty:

Turkish overnight interest rates squeezed to 300% on Monday. Then 600% on Tuesday. By Wednesday, they hit 1,200%. Downward pressure on the Turkish lira, and the government’s efforts to punish speculators fueled the historic rise. Erdogan allegedly wants to limit lira loses ahead of today’s elections. The pressures that drove the currency lower were mainly of Turkish origin. Of course, the Turks have every right to their own economic policies, but they must bear the consequences. That’s what comes with being a sovereign state.

The Greeks and Turks are neighbors. The Turks began negotiations to join the EU in 2005, with plans to adopt the Euro after their acceptance. Those negotiations stalled in 2016. As they look across the border at their Greek neighbors now, and see their interest rates stuck at -0.40%, are they envious? Perhaps. But having witnessed the 2011 Greek humiliation, would the Turks be willing to forfeit sovereignty for the Euro’s stability and stagnation? And how do the Greeks (and Italians) feel about having forfeited their sovereignty?

Anecdote:

“Only optimists start companies,” I answered. The Australian superannuation CEO had asked if I’m an optimist or pessimist. “I see the potential for technological advances to produce abundance in ways difficult to fathom. But I also see the chance of something profoundly dark,” I continued. He observed that people seemed consumed by the latter but spend so little time on the former. “That’s good. Humans are wonderful at solving problems of our own creation. The more we worry, the less goes wrong,” I said. So he asked what worries me most?

“Not the displacement of human labor by machines, we can solve the resulting social challenges. I worry that the only thing Americans seem to agree on now is that China is our adversary.” And pressing, he asked me to list the things I admire about China. “Okay. I admire China’s work ethic, drive, ambition, economic accomplishments. They’ve overtaken us in many advanced scientific fields. I admire that very much.” He smiled and asked me to carry on. “I’m grateful for their competition. It makes us better. And I admire that they’ve evolved communism to make it work while all others failed. The world is better with diversity of thought, philosophy – diversity increases resiliency, robustness. And democratic free-market capitalism will grow stronger with a formidable competitor.” He smiled.

“But China’s system values the collective over the individual. We value the opposite. And I’m concerned the two systems cannot peacefully coexist now that we’re the world’s two largest economies. I don’t want to live under their system, I don’t want their vision of the future for my children. They probably feel the same way. Both views are valid but incompatible, and increasingly in conflict,” I explained. He nodded and said, “I don’t want that for our children either.”

Source: ZeroHedge

Yield Curve Inverts For The First Time Since 2007: Recession Countdown Begins

The most prescient recession indicator in the market just inverted for the first time since 2007.

https://www.zerohedge.com/s3/files/inline-images/bfm960.jpg?itok=c0gP8hQC

https://i0.wp.com/northmantrader.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/yield.png?ssl=1

Don’t believe us? Here is Larry Kudlow last summer explaining that everyone freaking out about the 2s10s spread is silly, they focus on the 3-month to 10-year spread that has preceded every recession in the last 50 years (with few if any false positives)… (fwd to 4:20)

As we noted below, on six occasions over the past 50 years when the three-month yield exceeded that of the 10-year, economic recession invariably followed, commencing an average of 311 days after the initial signal. 

And here is Bloomberg showing how the yield curve inverted in 1989, in 2000 and in 2006, with recessions prompting starting in 1990, 2001 and 2008. This time won’t be different.

https://www.zerohedge.com/s3/files/inline-images/prior%20inversions.jpg?itok=BgnEMjCQ

On the heels of a dismal German PMI print, world bond yields have tumbled, extending US Treasuries’ rate collapse since The Fed flip-flopped full dovetard.

https://www.zerohedge.com/s3/files/inline-images/bfm14B0.jpg?itok=Ez0lIVd_

The yield curve is now inverted through 7Y…

https://www.zerohedge.com/s3/files/inline-images/bfm1EA4.jpg?itok=xPH6zVO8

With the 7Y-Fed-Funds spread negative…

https://www.zerohedge.com/s3/files/inline-images/bfm2864.jpg?itok=HqnSx1RR

Bonds and stocks bid after Powell threw in the towell last week…

https://www.zerohedge.com/s3/files/inline-images/bfmA98E.jpg?itok=D4zUXHf3

But the message from the collapse in bond yields is too loud to ignore. 10Y yields have crashed below 2.50% for the first time since Jan 2018…

https://www.zerohedge.com/s3/files/inline-images/bfm5670.jpg?itok=rocy5sKV

Crushing the spread between 3-month and 10-year Treasury rates to just 2.4bps – a smidge away from flashing a big red recession warning…

https://www.zerohedge.com/s3/files/inline-images/bfm36A8.jpg?itok=3cfUyMJ1

Critically, as Jim Grant noted recently, the spread between the 10-year and three-month yields is an important indicator, James Bianco, president and eponym of Bianco Research LLC notes today. On six occasions over the past 50 years when the three-month yield exceeded that of the 10-year, economic recession invariably followed, commencing an average of 311 days after the initial signal. 

Bianco concludes that the market, like Trump, believes that the current Funds rate isn’t low enough:

While Powell stressed over and over that the Fed is at “neutral,” . . . the market is saying the rate hike cycle ended last December and the economy will weaken enough for the Fed to see a reason to cut in less than a year.

https://www.zerohedge.com/s3/files/inline-images/bfm1B73_0.jpg?itok=iZGfa7C7

Equity markets remain ignorant of this risk, seemingly banking it all on The Powell Put. We give the last word to DoubleLine’s Jeff Gundlach as a word of caution on the massive decoupling between bonds and stocks…

“Just because things seem invincible doesn’t mean they are invincible. There is kryptonite everywhere. Yesterday’s move created more uncertainty.”

Source: ZeroHedge

10Y Treasury Yield Tumbles Below 2.50% As 7Y Inverts

The bond bull market is alive and well with yesterday’s bond-bear-battering by The Fed extending this morning.

10Y Yields are back below 2.50% for the first time since Jan 2018…

https://www.zerohedge.com/s3/files/inline-images/bfmCA1F.jpg?itok=_jgnif7R

…completely decoupled from equity markets….

https://www.zerohedge.com/s3/files/inline-images/bfm51AD.jpg?itok=s4YZh3r-

The yield is now massively inverted to Fed Funds…

https://www.zerohedge.com/s3/files/inline-images/bfm8BAA.jpg?itok=hEx0M8LV

With 7Y yields now below effective fed funds rate…

https://www.zerohedge.com/s3/files/inline-images/bfm5F7C.jpg?itok=yYvetY6-

Source: ZeroHedge

Are You Prepared For A Credit Freeze?

2, 3 and 5-Year Treasury Yields All Drop Below The Fed Funds Rate

Things are getting increasingly more crazy in bond land, where moments ago the 2Y Treasury dipped below 2.40%, trading at 2.3947% to be exact, and joining its 3Y and 5Y peers, which were already trading with a sub-2.4% handle. Why is that notable? Because 2.40% is where the Effective Fed Funds rate is, by definition the safest of safe yields in the market, that backstopped by the Fed itself. In other words, for the first time since 2008, the 2Y (and 3Y and 5Y) are all trading below the effective Fed Funds rate.

That the curve is now inverted from the Fed Funds rate all the way to the 5Y Treasury position suggests that whatever is coming, will be very ugly as increasingly more traders bet that one or more central banks may have no choice but to backstop risk assets and they will do it – how else – by buying bonds, sending yields to levels last seen during QE… i.e., much, much lower.

https://confoundedinterestnet.files.wordpress.com/2019/01/5eff.png

Explained…

Source: ZeroHedge

***

Gold Soars Above $1,300; Nikkei, JGB Yields Tumble As Rout Goes Global

https://www.zerohedge.com/sites/default/files/inline-images/gold%20futs%201.3.jpg?itok=Wll68K3N

Highly Unusual US Treasury Yield Pattern Not Seen Since Summer of 2000

Curve watchers anonymous has taken an in-depth review of US treasury yield charts on a monthly and daily basis. There’s something going on that we have not see on a sustained basis since the summer of 2000. Some charts will show what I mean.

Monthly Treasury Yields 3-Month to 30-Years 1998-Present:

https://mishgea.files.wordpress.com/2017/09/yield-curve-2017-09-07b1.png?w=768&h=448

It’s very unusual to see the yield on the long bond falling for months on end while the yield on 3-month bills and 1-year note rises. It’s difficult to spot the other time that happened because of numerous inversions. A look at the yield curve for Treasuries 3-month to 5-years will make the unusual activity easier to spot.

Monthly Treasury Yields 3-Month to 5-Years 1990-Present:

https://mishgea.files.wordpress.com/2017/09/yield-curve-2017-09-07a3.png?w=768&h=454

Daily Treasury Yields 3-Month to 5-Years 2016-2017:

https://mishgea.files.wordpress.com/2017/09/yield-curve-2017-09-07c1.png?w=768&h=448

Daily Treasury Yields 3-Month to 5-Years 2000:

https://mishgea.files.wordpress.com/2017/09/yield-curve-2017-09-07d.png?w=768&h=453

One cannot blame this activity on hurricanes or a possible government shutdown. The timeline dates to December of 2016 or March of 2017 depending on how one draws the lines.

This action is not at all indicative of an economy that is strengthening.

Rather, this action is indicative of a market that acts as if the Fed is hiking smack in the face of a pending recession.

Hurricanes could be icing on the cake and will provide a convenient excuse for the Fed and Trump if a recession hits.

Related Articles

  1. Confident Dudley Expects Rate Hikes Will Continue, Hurricane Effect to Provide Long Run “Economic Benefit”
  2. Hurricane Harvey Ripple Effects: Assessing the Impact on Housing and GDP
  3. “10-Year Treasury Yields Headed to Zero Percent” Saxo Bank CIO

By Mike “Mish” Shedlock

Yields Acting Like Economy Is Heading Into Recession

Treasury Yields and Rate Hike Odds Sink: Investigating the Yield Curve

The futures market is starting to question the June rate hike thesis. For its part, the bond market is behaving as if the Fed is hiking the economy into a recession. Here are some pictures.

June Rate Hike Odds

https://mishgea.files.wordpress.com/2017/05/fedwatch-2017-05-17.png?w=768&h=693

No Hike in June Odds

  • Month ago – 51%
  • Week Ago – 12.3%
  • Yesterday – 21.5%
  • Today – 35.4%

10-Year Treasury Note Yield

https://mishgea.files.wordpress.com/2017/05/10-year-2017-05-171.png

The yield on the 10-year treasury note doubled from the low of 1.32% during the week of July 2, 2016, to the high 2.64% during the week of December 10, 2016.

Since March 11, 2017, the yield on the 10-year treasury note declined 40 basis points to 2.24%.

30-Year Long Bond

https://mishgea.files.wordpress.com/2017/05/30-year-2017-05-17.png

The yield on the 30-year treasury bond rose from the low of 2.09% during the week of July 2, 2016, to the high of 3.21% during the week of March 11, 2017.

Since March 11, 2017, the yield on the 30-year treasury bond declined 29 basis points to 2.92%

1-Year Treasury Note Yield

https://mishgea.files.wordpress.com/2017/05/1-year-2017-05-17.png

The yield on the 1-year treasury more than doubled from the low of 0.43% during the week of July 2, 2016, to the high 1.14% during the week of May 6, 2017.

Since March 11, 2017, the yield curve has flattened considerably.

Action in the treasury yields is just what one would expect if the economy was headed into recession.

By Mike “Mish” Shedlock | MishTalk